English

The discipline of English examines the history of British and American literatures, teaches the skills of critical and perceptive reading, and develops a facility for clear, precise, and elegant writing. The student who majors in this field is prepared for any career in which analytical thought and clear communication are important: teaching, publishing, journalism, law, business, and certain areas of medicine.

Scripps Faculty

Gayle Greene
Professor of English

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Warren Liu
Assistant Professor of English

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Aaron Matz
Associate Professor of English
Chair, English Department

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John Peavoy
Associate Professor of English

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Cheryl Walker
Richard Armour Chair in Modern Languages

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Jacqueline Wernimont
Assistant Professor of English

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Department Goals and Objectives

  1. Students will learn basic skills in literary studies.
  2. Students will learn to see their arguments in historical context.
  3. Students will learn to recognize and construct well-formed arguments.
  4. Students will learn to articulate their ideas cogently and persuasively in a variety of media / formats including writing and oral presentation.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • SLO1:
    1. Student exhibits the ability to read primary texts closely.
    2. Student is able to pose effective questions about form, content, and literary devices.
    3. Student engages with relevant critical approaches and with secondary material in literary studies.
  • SLO2:
    1. Student demonstrates an awareness that her arguments participate in a long-term conversation about the nature, function, and value of literary works.
    2. Student is able to situate particular textual instances within literary history.
  • SLO3:
    1. Student recognizes well-formed arguments, including recognition of argumentative structure, use of evidence, and a disciplinary framework.
    2. Student constructs such arguments.
  • SLO4:
    1. Student engages the appropriate audience.
    2. Student's work is well-organized.
    3. Student's work is of an appropriate length.
    4. Student's work is situated within a critical conversation.