Art Conservation

This major introduces students to the field of art conservation, which addresses artistic, ethical, and technical questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and combines the liberal arts and sciences to solve problems of preservation. The major also prepares students for rigorous graduate programs in art conservation. A variety of science, art history, art, and other courses prepare students to engage in internships at the Williamson Gallery, enroll in conservation courses in off-campus study programs, and build a portfolio of practical experience necessary for graduate school admission. The major introduces students to careers in art conservation, which can encompass three roles—conservator, researcher, and manager. These roles correspond to application, science, and policy areas of study in the conservation of architecture, archaeology, archives, and art.

Scripps Faculty

Bruce Coats
Professor of Art History and the Humanities
Chair, Department of Art History

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Eric Doehne
Visiting Lecturer in Art Conservation

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Mary Hatcher-Skeers
Sidney J. Weinberg, Jr. Chair in Natural Sciences
Professor of Chemistry

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Juliet Koss
Director of the Humanities Institute
Associate Professor of Art History
(909) 607-8997

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Nancy Macko
Professor of Art

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Mary MacNaughton
Professor of Art History
Director, Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery
(909) 607--3517

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Alice Boccia Paterakis
Lecturer

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Susan Rankaitis
Fletcher Jones Chair in Studio Art

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Anna G. Wenzel
Associate Professor of Chemistry

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Department Goals and Objectives

  1. Students will learn the importance of preserving cultural resources in archaeology, art, and architecture.
  2. Students will learn how to analyze conservation problems from different perspectives, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, chemistry and studio art.
  3. Students will learn how to communicate effectively about art conservation and objects of material culture both orally and in written forms.
  4. Students will develop artistic skills in working with two-dimensional and three-dimensional materials.
  5. Students will learn how to conduct research in the discipline and produce senior thesis demonstrating their ability to define a problem; use the available resources (archives, libraries, museums, etc.) to analyze the problem; and present results of the research with clear documentation in clear prose following correct academic form.
  6. Students will learn to apply a knowledge of general and organic chemistry to problems in art conservation.
  7. Students working on scientifically focused art-conservation projects will develop hypotheses, test them using quantitative techniques, and explain scientific concepts both verbally and in writing.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • SLO1: Students will demonstrate knowledge of works of cultural resources in archaeology, art, and architecture in a range of historical, sociopolitical, and cultural contexts.
  • SLO2: Students will demonstrate knowledge of analysis of conservation problems from different perspectives, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, chemistry, and studio art.
  • SLO3: Students will communicate effectively about works of art and architecture both orally and in written forms.
  • SLO4: Students will demonstrate artistic skills in working with two-dimensional and three-dimensional materials.
  • SLO5: Students will produce senior theses demonstrating their ability to define a problem; use the resources readily available in the area (libraries, archives, museums, galleries, etc.) to carry out research; and present the results of their research with full documentation in clear prose following correct academic form.
  • SLO6: Students will learn to apply a knowledge of general and organic chemistry to problems in art conservation.
  • SLO7: Students working on scientifically focused art-conservation projects will demonstrate development of hypotheses, test them using quantitative techniques, and explain scientific concepts both verbally and in writing.