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Alumnae Newsmakers


June 16, 2021

Summer Thyme ’06 Named Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences

Summer Thyme ’06, an assistant professor of neurobiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has been named to the 2021 Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences, which funds human health and disease research by early-career investigators.

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March 8, 2021

Spotlight on Alumnae: Young Alumnae Start “Adulthood Pending” Podcast

Inspired by their struggles to both define and navigate adulthood, three Scripps College alumnae, Okamura, Annalise Ko ’19, and Kimi Kaneshina ’20, launched the Adulthood Pending Podcast for college students, recent graduates, or anyone else who is also figuring out that being an adult is not as simple as it is made out to be.

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February 5, 2021

The Alum Behind the COVID-19 Vaccine: Dr. Rachel Presti

Last July, Dr. Rachel Presti ’94 made the news when she became a principal investigator on large-scale phase-3 vaccine trials that enrolled thousands of participants from around the world to determine whether newly developed vaccines could prevent COVID-19.

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January 21, 2021

Madison Blumer ’15 Coauthors Paper on Sex Chromosome Turnover in Geckos for Genes

Madison Blumer ’15 coauthored a paper on sex chromosome turnover in bent-toed geckos in a special issue of Genes, which focused on the evolution of chromosomes in vertebrates. Although squamate lizards, or scaled reptiles, have diverse sex chromosome systems, the turnover rate in bent-toed geckos is even more frequent than in other lizards of the order Squamata.

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January 13, 2021

Alison Saar ’78’s Sculpture Featured in Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art’s New Online Exhibition

Alison Saar ’78’s sculpture Inheritance (2009) will be featured in the Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art’s upcoming virtual exhibition, which highlights selections from the museum’s permanent contemporary art collection.

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December 17, 2020

Students, Young Alums Add Their Books to Scripps’ Strong Literary Tradition

Nikita Chinamanthur ’20 didn’t plan to write a novel. When she set out to tackle her first book-length project last September, she intended to write a nonfiction exploration of Hindi cinema. However, Chinamanthur soon found herself drawn to a very different kind of story.

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October 22, 2020

Visiting Lecturer Jessica Christian ’07 Connects the United States’ Past to Its Present

For Visiting Lecturer of History Jessica Christian ’07, the past is always present. Although she’s teaching an introduction to US history course, the subjects she’s covering—which include disease, colonization, environmentalism, and politics—feel both modern and familiar in a year marked by a global pandemic, protests for racial justice, and an unprecedented presidential election season.

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October 5, 2020

Summer Thyme ’06 Awarded Mallinckrodt Grant for Study of Zebrafish Neurodevelopment

Summer Thyme ’06, an assistant professor of neurobiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, was awarded a prestigious Mallinckrodt Grant to study the neurological development of zebrafish. Because zebrafish share 70 percent of their genes with humans, Thyme hopes that her research will identify the genes that may play a part in human neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia.

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September 21, 2020

Maddy Ruvolo ’14 Discusses Transportation, Urban Planning, and New Mobility Services with the Disability Visibility Project

Maddy Ruvolo ’14 discussed public transportation, urban planning issues, and new mobility services, such as rideshare apps, scooters, and bike share systems, with the Disability Visibility Project. As part of her capstone project for her master’s program, Ruvolo, who is a disabled transportation planner, surveyed disabled residents of San Francisco about their experiences with new mobility technologies and services.

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September 9, 2020

Clare Cannon ’08 Explores the Pandemic’s Effect on Psychological Health

Clare Cannon ’08, assistant professor of community and regional development at the University of California, Davis, is studying the pandemic’s effects on psychological health, stress, and resilience. Cannon hopes to use her research, which focuses on the pandemic’s exacerbation of social and environmental inequality, as well as intimate partner violence, to determine how people can receive better support during the coronavirus crisis.

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