The Humanities Institute

Program Archive

Marginality

The general topic of the lectures, conferences, and films sponsored by the Humanities Institute this term is “Marginality”. Our speakers will address various aspects and consequences of the ways that societies—not just political societies, but societies like the academic community—in the process of defining themselves, relegate some of their members to a marginal status. The margins of a society may be defined politically or socially or economically or by race or creed or sexual orientation—or, as is often the case, in several of these ways together. Issues of marginality may also arise when one society dominates another. The notion of marginality may help us to understand, for example the relation of colonial societies to their colonies or the relation of the United States. In our events this fall our speakers will be concerned promarily with the ways in which marginality is evidenced in culture, particularly, in literature.

Speakers and Events

September 10, 1988
Edward Said
Department of English and Comparative Literature Columbia University

Scripps College

September 22, 1988

Department of English, University of Pittsburgh

"Versions of the Margin: Coetzee's Foe Reading Robinson Crusoe"
Scripps College

September 10, 1989
Rene Girard
Department of French and Italian, Stanford University

"Marginality: Myth and Reality"
Scripps College

October 3, 1989
Jorge Bustamante
El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Mexico

"El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Mexico "Undocumented Immigration as a Source of Marginality"
Scripps College