Close

Nancy Neiman

Professor of Politics
Interim Chair, Department of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Department: Politics
Office Address: Balch 306
Office Phone: (909) 607-3549
Office Hours: Th 10-11:45am or by appointment
Email: nneiman@scrippscollege.edu
Personal Website: http://pages.scrippscollege.edu/~nneiman/index.html
Nancy Neiman

Academic History

  • B.A. University of California, Berkeley
  • M.A. Economics, Yale University
  • Ph.D. Political Science, Yale University

Areas of Expertise

Professor Neiman’s expertise in political economy ranges from financial markets in developing countries, social movements and financial crises in Latin America, the influence of business over public policy, and the global food system.

Personal Interests

Nancy enjoys staying active through a variety of sports and activities including tennis, hiking and Hot Pilates. She is also an avid cook, gardener and eater.

Selected Research and Publications

Professor Neiman is the author of States, Banks, and Markets: Mexico’s Path to Financial Liberalization in Comparative Perspective (Westview, 2001), and has published articles on topics such as neoliberalism, dollarization, and financial crises.

Her current book project, Infrastructures of Justice, includes a variety of case studies, including an interfaith coffee cooperative in Uganda, Cuban financial reform, globalization in Juárez Mexico, and the U.S. meatpacking industry, to provide a framework for understanding the conditions under which markets promote or undermine social justice.

Awards and Honors

  • 2016 Crossroads Service Award (honoring 6 years of dedicated service)
  • 2014 Claremont Unified School District Valued Community Partner Award
  • 2013 Sustainable Claremont Community Partnership Award
  • 2012 Halo Foundation Community Volunteer Award
  • 2011 Mary Wig Johnson Endowed Teaching Chair
  • 2010 Blais Challenge Grant ($25,900 for research and at-risk youth garden project)
  • 2009 Mary Johnson Community Service Award
  • 2008 Claremont Colleges Presidents’ Sustainability Grant
  • 2009 Claremont Colleges Presidents’ Sustainability Grant
  • 2010 Claremont Colleges Presidents’ Sustainability Grant
  • 2007 Mary Wig Johnson Teaching Award
  • 2006 Mary Wig Johnson Community Service Award
  • 2004 Freeman Program in Asian Political Economy Course Development Grant
  • 2003 Scripps College Sabbatical Research Grant
  • 2003 Freeman Program in Asian Political Economy Research Grant
  • 2002 Mary Wig Johnson Community Service Award
  • 2002 Awards Convocation Speaker
  • 2000 Mary Wig Johnson Research Award
  • 1998 Awards Convocation Speaker
  • 1998 Mary Wig Johnson Community Service Award
  • 1997 Mary Wig Johnson Teaching Award
  • 1997 Scripps College Alumnae Leadership Award
  • 1996 Scripps College Sabbatical Research Grant
  • 1994 U.S Department of Education Course Development/Travel Grant
  • 1993 Irvine Foundation Faculty Development Grant
  • 1992 Yale University Dissertation Fellowship
  • 1990 Yale University Graduate Fellowship
  • 1987-9 Ford Foundation Minority Pre-doctoral Fellowship

Biography

Book

Infrastructures of Justice under review

States, Banks, and Markets: Mexico’s Path to Financial Liberalization in Comparative Perspective, Westview Press, 2001.

Articles and Chapters

  • “Plant Justice: An Alternative to Alternative Food and Alternative Education?” (Co-authored with Jean Schroedel) publication pending
  • “Delicious Peace Coffee: Marketing Community in Uganda,” The Review of Radical Political Economy, 2012.
  • “Financial Liberalization and International Capital Flows,” co-authored by Thomas Willett, Yoonmin Kim, and Thana Sompornserm in Willett ed., The Global Crisis and Korea’s International Financial Policies. Korea Policy Institute, 2009.
  • “Assessing the State of State Reform in Latin America,” review of El Estado de las Reformas del Estado en America Latina, Americas Quarterly, Winter 2007.
  • “Petrodollars,” Princeton Encyclopedia of the World Economy, Princeton University Press, 2009.
  • “Financial Liberalization,” Princeton Encyclopedia of the World Economy, Princeton University Press, 2009.
  • “Latin American Debt Crisis,” Princeton Encyclopedia of the World Economy, Princeton University Press, 2009.
  • “The Meanings of Neoliberalism,” in Ravi Roy, Art Denzau, and Thomas Willett eds., Neoliberalism: National and Regional Experiments with Global Ideas, Routledge, 2007.
  • “The Political Economy of Dollarization in Mexico,” co-authored with Aldo Flores in Dominick Salvatore, James Dean, and Thomas Willett eds., The Dollarization Debate, Oxford University Press, 2003.
  • “Bank-led Finance and External Competitiveness in Germany and Mexico,” Review of International Political Economy, 7(2), Summer 2000.
  • “The Mexican Peso Crisis and the Ramifications of Bank Domination,” Lowe Institute Policy Brief, Claremont McKenna College, December 1997.

Courses Taught

Nancy Neiman teaches a wide range of political economy and Core Humanities courses including, Making Sense of Power, Race and American Liberalism, Introduction to Political Economy, the Power Elite, and Infrastructures of Justice.

Professor Neiman also teaches a Political Economy of Food course through which she has organized a number of community engagement projects that bridge theory and practice among which are a social enterprise organized with women who were formerly incarcerated, a program called Plant Justice with students at an alternative high school, and a Meatless Monday program that brings students and women who were formerly incarcerated together to share prepare and share meals and food justice programming.

She also teaches intergenerational learning courses and an Inside-Out course inside a prison.

Courses taught

  • Survey of Political Economy (Poli 130)
  • Markets and Politics in Latin American (Poli 111)
  • The Power Elite: Surveying the Influence of Business over Public Policy (Poli 122)
  • Race and American Capitalism (Poli 128)
  • Infrastructures of Justice (Poli 134)
  • Politics Senior Research Seminar (Poli 190)
  • Independent Study in Organizing for Social Justice (Poli 199)
  • Theories of International Political Economy (IR 149)
  • Economic Development (Poli 132/Econ 144)
  • Financial Issues in Emerging Markets (Poli 187/Econ 197a)
  • Principles of Economics (Econ 50)
  • Principles of Microeconomics (Econ 52)
  • Microeconomics for Public Policy (SPE 313)
  • Culture, Knowledge and Representation (Core I)
  • The Culture of Capitalism: Race, Class, and American Liberalism (Core II)
  • We are What We Eat: Political Economy and Culture of Food (Core II)
  • Making Sense of Power: Foucault, Gramsci, and Affect Theory (Core II)
  • The Culture of Capitalism: Race, Ethnicity and Entrepreneurship (Core III)
  • The Political Economy of Food (Poli 135)
  • Food Politics Practicum (Poli 195a)

Office Locator