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Oct. 31, 2019

When Seeing Is Not Believing: Douglas Goodwin, Fletcher Jones Scholar in Computation, on the Image in the Digital Age

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Apr. 8, 2019

Ahead of the Curve: Scripps Alumnae are Applying Information Science in a Variety of Fields

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Apr. 2, 2019

Data Driven: Scripps Integrates Computer Science Skills into a Liberal Arts Curriculum

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Mar. 25, 2019

Misinformed: An interview with Associate Professor of Philosophy Yuval Avnur

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Mar. 18, 2019

Focus on Faculty: Sheila Walker, Professor of Psychology

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Scripps Magazine


October 31, 2019

When Seeing Is Not Believing: Douglas Goodwin, Fletcher Jones Scholar in Computation, on the Image in the Digital Age

Douglas Goodwin has always been fascinated with how time, context, and perspective shape our conception of reality.

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April 8, 2019

Ahead of the Curve: Scripps Alumnae are Applying Information Science in a Variety of Fields

Though the reasons to come to Scripps are as diverse as Scripps students themselves, they are often rooted in beliefs about the transformational power of a liberal arts education. Scripps students are less concerned about specific vocational goals and more interested in the kinds of people they hope they will become: grounded, well-informed, thoughtful citizens of the world.

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April 2, 2019

Data Driven: Scripps Integrates Computer Science Skills into a Liberal Arts Curriculum

In 2016,  the  National Academies of Sciences, Engineering,  and Medicine in Washington,  D.C., convened a committee of experts from government,  industry,  and academia to examine undergraduate enrollment trends.  

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March 25, 2019

Misinformed: An interview with Associate Professor of Philosophy Yuval Avnur

In our digital age, information is more accessible to more people than ever before. Yet one of the central concerns of public life is our susceptibility to the influence of bad information, whether in the form of fake news articles, doctored images, or manipulated video. Associate Professor of Philosophy Yuval Avnur comes to this dilemma as an epistemologist, interested in how we arrive at knowledge in the first place.

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March 18, 2019

Focus on Faculty: Sheila Walker, Professor of Psychology

Over the past few decades, the United States has become increasingly racially and ethnically diverse. However, within the discipline of psychology, studies of the lives of people of color in the U.S.—especially young women—have been much too narrow, according to Professor of Psychology Sheila Walker.

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December 4, 2018

Parallel Unions

In 2016, the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union (EU) in a move known as “Brexit.” Since its inception over half a century ago, the EU had come to stand as the paradigm of democratic cooperation, promoting ideals such as open borders, cosmopolitanism, and humanitarianism.

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November 22, 2018

Focus on Faculty: Thierry Boucquey, Professor of French

The first thing to know about Professor of French Thierry Boucquey is that he has a personal motto. The second and more important thing to know is that he actually lives by it. “Mens sana in corpore sanois a Latin phrase meaning ‘a healthy mind in a healthy body,” says Boucquey as we sit down together on the occasion of his retirement from Scripps.

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November 20, 2018

A Latitude Beyond: Branwen Williams Ventures Near and Far to Unlock the Mysteries of Climate Change

Standing in the tide pools at El Matador Beach in Malibu, California, Branwen Williams, associate professor of environmental science at the W.M. Keck Science Department, looks out at the horizon as the sun descends over the Pacific.

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February 14, 2018

From the Archives: The Love Song of T. S. Eliot and Emily Hale

T. S. Eliot hated California. In a series of private letters written in early 1933, he called it “a horrible place,” “a nightmare,” and one of America’s “two great mistakes” (the other being New York). Eliot’s correspondents were, not surprisingly, British—and the missives may be partly indicative of the poet’s longing for England, after nearly a year abroad, rather than of full-hearted contempt for California. At the very least, there was one thing about California that he was sincerely devoted to.

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October 15, 2017

Scripps Magazine: Art Forms

Alison Saar ’78 Weight, at first glance, appears to be a young girl playing on a swing, until one realizes that the child is stripped bare. Her swing is attached to a broken branch that hangs from a vintage cotton scale. Her weight is counterbalanced with a coal scuttle “cornucopia” of tools of domestic labor—a […]

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