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2017 Spring Walls, Borders, Fences


December 16, 2016

Public Panel Discussion – Ather Zia & Huma Dar

Kashmir in the Shadows of Walls & Barbed-Wires: Postcolonial Contestation over Lives, Lands, Languages Moderated by Piya Chatterjee, Scripps College In 1947-8, up to a million and a half Muslims were ethnically-cleansed, a third massacred and the rest forcibly exiled from one part of the Princely State of Jammu & Kashmir—the part that soon thereafter […]

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Public Panel Discussion – Rosa-Linda Fregoso & Margo Tamez

Resurgence in Spaces of Impunity: Indigenous and Latinx Perspectives Moderated by Carmen Sanjuan-Pastor (Spanish, Scripps) Margo Tamez’ talk, “The Return and Resurgence of the Nde’ Monster Slayer and the 4th Arrow after and beyond the Wall,” will ‘travel’ in circular Indigenous space-time-place poetics and visual self-determination, to express, transmit, and situate Nde’ (Lipan Apache) critical […]

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Film screening + Q& A with filmmakers – The Narrow Streets of Bourj Hammoud

The Narrow Streets of Bourj Hammoud is a 72-minute experimental non-fiction film about a working-class suburb of Beirut, Lebanon. The neighborhood was initially built to permanently settle Armenian refugees who escaped the 1915 genocide in the Ottoman Empire. Today, it is a diverse district that is also home to non-Armenian Lebanese communities as well as migrants and refugees […]

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Public Talk – Naor Ben-Yehoyada

Seas of “Brotherhood” and Fields of “Care”: Refuge, Rescue, and Retribution in the Mediterranean and Europe The Mediterranean has recently appeared in the international news cycle as the sea that migrants try to cross towards European shores – where many of them die. Advocates, officials, and observers have usually addressed the situation under the umbrella […]

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Public Lecture – Lori Allen

Performing Democracy: The Problem of Political Representation in Investigative Commissions to Palestine Over the past century, the conflict in Palestine has been the subject of tens of fact-finding commissions. Whether sent by western governments or the United Nations, these commissions are usually made up of legal experts, academics, and diplomats, dispatched to hear from witnesses, […]

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Student Only Workshop – Ben Wood

Lessons from the Frontlines: Grassroots Activism in the Inland Empire Ben Wood, activist and organizer   *Co-sponsored by the Scripps Politics Department and Office of Dean of Students

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Public Event – Thomas Abowd

Jerusalem, on the Moving Edge of Israeli Colonial Rule What kinds of barriers—physical, legal, and discursive—operate to keep Israeli-occupied Jerusalem a city of immense separation and inequality? In this presentation, urban anthropologist, historian, and author Thomas Abowd will analyze how colonialism and colonial urbanism remain a crucial component of contemporary Palestinian and Israeli realities. Abowd […]

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Tuesday Noon – Wendy Cheng

‘Our Mutual L.A. Suburban Pasts’: Race and Cosmopolitanism in Greater Los Angeles Los Angeles’ San Gabriel Valley is the largest majority-Asian American and Latinx region in the United States. Scripps professor of American studies Wendy Cheng addresses the development of a distinct multiracial identity grounded in working- and middle-class, suburban spaces and how the formative histories and lived […]

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Public Lecture – Audra Simpson

We Are Not Red Indians” (We Might All Be Red Indians): Anticolonial Sovereignty Across the Borders of Time, Place and Sentiment In 2004, Yasser Arafat noted that “the Palestine case was the biggest problem in the world” and that Israel had “failed to wipe us out.” As a final mark of that success, he added […]

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Tuesday Noon – Myriam J. Chancy

The Politics of Exclusion: Narrating Post-Earthquake Haiti In this reading from her novel-in-progress, “Douze,” Myriam J. A. Chancy — author, Guggenheim Fellow, and HBA Chair of the Humanities at Scripps College – attempts to narrate a variety of points of view on the lived experience of the January 12, 2010 earthquake which devastated central parts […]

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Tuesday Noon – Christian Ramírez

Revitalize Not Militarize: the Struggle for Human Rights in the Southern Border The southern border region is home to some 15 million people living in border communities in California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. It is also one of the most militarized border regions in the hemisphere. In this talk, Christian Ramírez, Director of Human […]

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Student Only Workshop – Christian Ramírez

A Discussion About Human Rights in the US-Mexico Border with Christian Ramírez Students will engage in a discussion about human rights in the US-Mexico Border with Christian Ramírez. Christian Ramírez was born in Tijuana, Mexico. Since 1994 Christian has been active on issues relating to US immigration policy and its impact on southern border communities. […]

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