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Arts and Culture (page 10)


March 20, 2018

Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery Interns Present Ancient Traditions, Modern Japan

A delicately patterned lady’s comb, an intricate woodblock print, a vibrant floral kimono: these objects and others on display in Ancient Traditions, Modern Japan: Japanese Art During the 20th Century are contemporary, but they have their roots in centuries-old Japanese traditions. The exhibition, organized by Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery interns Marielle Epstein ’18, Gillian Holzer ’19, and Milena Carothers ’19, invites viewers to explore ways in which traditional Japanese art forms have been employed and adapted by artists working in the 20th century.

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March 16, 2018

The Missing Pictures and Sounds of Memory: A Celebration of Cambodian Film and Contemporary Classical Music

In the wake of decades of French colonization and capitalizing on the power vacuum left by years of civil war, Cambodia’s communist party, the Khmer Rouge, took full control of the city of Phnom Penh in 1975, forever redirecting the course of the country’s history.

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March 2, 2018

In the Media: Roberto Pedace Discusses Diversity in Film on NPR

On the eve of the 2018 Academy Awards, Roberto Pedace, professor of economics at Scripps College, spoke on NPR’s 1A on diversity in film and what changes in representation mean for Hollywood’s bottom line.

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February 28, 2018

Scripps Presents: Liz Lerman

Liz Lerman is an icon. For the past four decades, the choreographer, performer, writer, and teacher has engaged artists and audiences alike with her intellectually curious, nimble explorations. She brings her generous and generative spirit to Scripps for a conversation and exploration of her latest ongoing project, Wicked Bodies, prompted by powerful and grotesque images of women’s bodies throughout history.

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February 21, 2018

Scripps Presents: Krista Suh

Following the 2016 presidential election, when millions of people were seeking outlets for their political frustrations, Krista Suh had the idea to use handicrafts to mobilize the nation. As co-founder of the Pussyhat Project, Suh helped turn the 2017 Women’s Marches into a sea of pink-capped protestors.

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February 14, 2018

From the Archives: The Love Song of T. S. Eliot and Emily Hale

T. S. Eliot hated California. In a series of private letters written in early 1933, he called it “a horrible place,” “a nightmare,” and one of America’s “two great mistakes” (the other being New York). Eliot’s correspondents were, not surprisingly, British—and the missives may be partly indicative of the poet’s longing for England, after nearly a year abroad, rather than of full-hearted contempt for California. At the very least, there was one thing about California that he was sincerely devoted to.

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February 13, 2018

Williamson Gallery Receives $10,000 Grant from Pasadena Art Alliance

The Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery has received a $10,000 grant to Scripps College from the Pasadena Art Alliance to support the catalog for the 2019 Ceramic Annual—Scripps College’s 75th entry in the perennially popular exhibit that has been running since World War II.

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February 9, 2018

Spotlight on Faculty: Scripps Welcomes Novelist Rachel Kushner as Mary Routt Chair in Writing

What’s the secret to becoming a great writer? According to Rachel Kushner, a two-time finalist for the National Book Award, one of the most critical, yet commonly overlooked aspects of the writing process begins even before putting pen to paper—it starts with becoming a keen observer. As Scripps’ Mary Routt Writing Chair, Kushner is teaching a course titled Looking and Listening, which will invite students to take a closer look at the spaces around them.

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February 6, 2018

Scripps Presents’ Krista Suh Event Featured by Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

Pussyhat creator Krista Suh’s recent presentation at Scripps College made a personal impression on Inland Valley Daily Bulletin columnist David Allen. 

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January 26, 2018

Ken Gonzales-Day’s Work Featured in KCRW’s Art Talk and Los Angeles Times Article

Ken Gonzales-Day’s photographic exhibit of Los Angeles’ myriad of murals is reviewed on a recent episode of KCRW’s Art Talk radio show, and the photographer’s work is also featured by the Los Angeles Times article in their coverage of Los Angeles-based multiartist festival, “Into Action,” which ran for nine days in January 2018.

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