News

Arts and Culture

April 9, 2018

In the Media: New Work by Alison Saar ’78 Reviewed in the LA Times

“Topsy Turvy,” an exhibition of new work by Scripps alumna and artist Alison Saar ’78, garnered high praise from the Los Angeles Times. In depicting Topsy, a slave girl character in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, “Saar has brilliantly made and remade [her], restoring her innate power to make herself,” writes critic Christopher Knight in his review.

April 5, 2018

In the Media: Ken Gonzales-Day in Smithsonian Magazine

Professor of Art Ken Gonzales-Day’s recent exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., is profiled in Smithsonian Magazine. The exhibition, “Unseen: Our Past in a New Light,” focuses on work by Gonzales-Day and Titus Kaphar that grapples with “the under- and misrepresentation of certain minorities in portraiture and American history.”

March 29, 2018

In the News: Alison Saar ’78 Presents an Exhibition of New Work

Scripps alum Alison Saar ’78 opened an exhibition of new work on March 29 at L.A. Louver Gallery in Los Angeles. Taking inspiration from the character of Topsy in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s classic Civil War–era novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Saar re-contextualizes the slave girl as a symbol of defiance in paintings on dyed vintage linens and sculptures carved from wood. The exhibition, titled "Topsy Turvy," runs until May 12.

March 20, 2018

In the News: Work by Cynthia Irobunda ’18 Selected for National College Dance Festival

In early March, the Scripps College Dance Department traveled to Ohio University for the American College Dance Association (ACDA) East-Central Conference to take classes, perform, and bond with students, faculty, and guest artists. As part of the conference, Cynthia Irobunda ’18, a psychology and dance double major, created and performed her original solo choreography, Nneka, for the adjudicated showcase. Nneka was then selected to be performed during the conference’s closing gala.

March 20, 2018

In the Media: Suchi Branfman’s Prison-Based Choreography Featured

Scripps Lecturer in Dance Suchi Branfman’s choreographic collaboration with incarcerated men at the California Rehabilitation Center is the subject of a recent article in The Argonaut.

March 20, 2018

Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery Interns Present Ancient Traditions, Modern Japan

A delicately patterned lady’s comb, an intricate woodblock print, a vibrant floral kimono: these objects and others on display in Ancient Traditions, Modern Japan: Japanese Art During the 20th Century are contemporary, but they have their roots in centuries-old Japanese traditions. The exhibition, organized by Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery interns Marielle Epstein ’18, Gillian Holzer ’19, and Milena Carothers ’19, invites viewers to explore ways in which traditional Japanese art forms have been employed and adapted by artists working in the 20th century.

March 16, 2018

The Missing Pictures and Sounds of Memory: A Celebration of Cambodian Film and Contemporary Classical Music

In the wake of decades of French colonization and capitalizing on the power vacuum left by years of civil war, Cambodia’s communist party, the Khmer Rouge, took full control of the city of Phnom Penh in 1975, forever redirecting the course of the country’s history.

March 2, 2018

In the Media: Roberto Pedace Discusses Diversity in Film on NPR

On the eve of the 2018 Academy Awards, Roberto Pedace, professor of economics at Scripps College, spoke on NPR’s 1A on diversity in film and what changes in representation mean for Hollywood’s bottom line.

February 28, 2018

Scripps Presents: Liz Lerman

Liz Lerman is an icon. For the past four decades, the choreographer, performer, writer, and teacher has engaged artists and audiences alike with her intellectually curious, nimble explorations. She brings her generous and generative spirit to Scripps for a conversation and exploration of her latest ongoing project, Wicked Bodies, prompted by powerful and grotesque images of women’s bodies throughout history.

February 21, 2018

Scripps Presents: Krista Suh

Following the 2016 presidential election, when millions of people were seeking outlets for their political frustrations, Krista Suh had the idea to use handicrafts to mobilize the nation. As co-founder of the Pussyhat Project, Suh helped turn the 2017 Women’s Marches into a sea of pink-capped protestors.