Patricia Williams to Speak on Seeing a Color Blind Future

CLAREMONT, Calif. (September 12, 2008) — Legal scholar Patricia J. Williams will speak on “Seeing A Color Blind Future” at Scripps College on Thursday, September 25, 2008, at 7:30 p.m. in Garrison Theater in the Performing Arts Center. A book signing will follow the event, with books available for purchase. The event is free and open to the public.

As the author of the monthly column “Diary of a Mad Law Professor” for The Nation magazine, Williams expresses her outlooks on issues of social justice, race, gender, rhetoric on the war on terror, and aspects of civil rights law in a wry, witty manner. She has also written scores of articles for scholarly journals, popular magazines and newspapers, in addition to her books The Alchemy of Race and Rights, published in 1991, Seeing a Color-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race, 1997, and her newest book, Open House: Of Family, Friends, Food, Piano Lessons, and a Search for a Room of My Own, a collection of personal stories, essays and anecdotes.

Williams is the James L. Dohr Professor of Law at Columbia University School of Law in New York and a graduate of Wellesley College and Harvard Law School. She has also garnered experience as a consumer advocate, staff attorney, and deputy city attorney. Williams has been honored as the recipient of several awards, including the Alumnae Achievement Award from Wellesley College, the Graduate Society Medal from Harvard University, and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship.


About Scripps College

Scripps College was founded in 1926 by Ellen Browning Scripps, a pioneering philanthropist and influential figure in the worlds of education, publishing, and women’s rights. Today, Scripps is a nationally top-ranked liberal arts college and women’s college with approximately 950 students, and is a member of The Claremont Colleges in southern California. The mission of Scripps College is to educate women to develop their intellects and talents through active participation in a community of scholars, so that as graduates they may contribute to society through public and private lives of leadership, service, integrity, and creativity.

 

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